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Should the Nazi Research Data Be Cited?

Should the Nazi Research Data Be Cited? he gruesome medical experiments that Nazi doctors conducted on unconsenting prisoners in concentration camps in World War 1 are notorious. The revela1 tions at the Nuremberg “doctors’ trial” in 1946-47 sparked intensive discussion of how to protect future research subjects from improper and even criminal actions. One tangible result was the Nuremberg Code, which is one of the major sources of the current federal research regulations in the United States. Debates have also raged over whether to allow publication of the results of research that have been deemed unethical. Not as much attention, however, has focused on what to do about research, now labeled unethical, that has already been published. Should the work ever be cited? The issue may strike some as merely an academic exercise, a case of pursuing an argument to a logical but absurd extreme. Yet a research article is only as strong as the data that support it. The long lists of monotonous references at the end of an article generally elicit a dispassionate response. Imagine my consternation, then, when I found in an otherwise conventional 1983 review on hypothermia4he effects of cold on the b o d y- a citation to the Dachau http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hastings Center Report Wiley

Should the Nazi Research Data Be Cited?

Hastings Center Report , Volume 14 (6) – Dec 1, 1984

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References (7)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1984 The Hastings Center
ISSN
0093-0334
eISSN
1552-146X
DOI
10.2307/3561733
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

he gruesome medical experiments that Nazi doctors conducted on unconsenting prisoners in concentration camps in World War 1 are notorious. The revela1 tions at the Nuremberg “doctors’ trial” in 1946-47 sparked intensive discussion of how to protect future research subjects from improper and even criminal actions. One tangible result was the Nuremberg Code, which is one of the major sources of the current federal research regulations in the United States. Debates have also raged over whether to allow publication of the results of research that have been deemed unethical. Not as much attention, however, has focused on what to do about research, now labeled unethical, that has already been published. Should the work ever be cited? The issue may strike some as merely an academic exercise, a case of pursuing an argument to a logical but absurd extreme. Yet a research article is only as strong as the data that support it. The long lists of monotonous references at the end of an article generally elicit a dispassionate response. Imagine my consternation, then, when I found in an otherwise conventional 1983 review on hypothermia4he effects of cold on the b o d y- a citation to the Dachau

Journal

Hastings Center ReportWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1984

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