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Single men's attitudes towards posthumous use of their sperm cryopreserved due to illness in Israel

Single men's attitudes towards posthumous use of their sperm cryopreserved due to illness in Israel INTRODUCTIONMale fertility preservation might be either planned or unplanned. In the first scenario, spermatozoa are frozen after consultation before life‐threatening conditions with an anticipated negative impact on male fertility, and written documentation of the patients’ instruction in the case of mortality is obtained. In the latter scenarios, spermatozoa are retrieved after an unexpected event leading to brain or cardiac death without any documentation of the patients' consent or wish.1 The frozen‐thawed specimens may be used for various modes of assisted reproduction depending on the quantity and quality of the cryopreserved spermatozoa and the female partner's parameters.In the case of death, the motivation for posthumous reproduction may be shared by both the deceased men and surviving parties or may originate from the surviving parties alone, especially when sperm cryopreservation was unplanned.2 In such a case society is faced with increasing legal, cultural, ethical, social, and religious dilemmas, especially when young men's life is lost under tragic circumstances and their will for procreation remains obscure, despite the fact that it is considered a fundamental right within various societies, traditions, and religions.3 The informed consent and directive orders in cases of planned sperm cryopreservation are the ethical and legal basis for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Andrology Wiley

Single men's attitudes towards posthumous use of their sperm cryopreserved due to illness in Israel

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References (14)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2023 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.
ISSN
2047-2919
eISSN
2047-2927
DOI
10.1111/andr.13483
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONMale fertility preservation might be either planned or unplanned. In the first scenario, spermatozoa are frozen after consultation before life‐threatening conditions with an anticipated negative impact on male fertility, and written documentation of the patients’ instruction in the case of mortality is obtained. In the latter scenarios, spermatozoa are retrieved after an unexpected event leading to brain or cardiac death without any documentation of the patients' consent or wish.1 The frozen‐thawed specimens may be used for various modes of assisted reproduction depending on the quantity and quality of the cryopreserved spermatozoa and the female partner's parameters.In the case of death, the motivation for posthumous reproduction may be shared by both the deceased men and surviving parties or may originate from the surviving parties alone, especially when sperm cryopreservation was unplanned.2 In such a case society is faced with increasing legal, cultural, ethical, social, and religious dilemmas, especially when young men's life is lost under tragic circumstances and their will for procreation remains obscure, despite the fact that it is considered a fundamental right within various societies, traditions, and religions.3 The informed consent and directive orders in cases of planned sperm cryopreservation are the ethical and legal basis for the

Journal

AndrologyWiley

Published: Jun 22, 2023

Keywords: cancer patients; posthumous reproduction; sperm cryopreservation

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