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Sjögren's Syndrome

Sjögren's Syndrome a filamentous type of keratitis has been recognized since the late nineteenth century, but it was not appreciated until relatively recently that the threads were derived from the cornea and that the condition was due to a deficiency of tears. In 1927 the association of the condition with a chronic arthritis was first described. It was, however, due to the work, since 1930, of Henrik Sjögren of Jönköping in Sweden that the condition has become more widely known and the various facets of the full syndrome recognized (Sjögren, 1933). By 1940 he had reported 50 cases and had pointed out that the conjunctiva was also involved. He therefore proposed the more comprehensive name of “keratoconjunctivitis sicca” and also an alternative designation with a pathological basis namely “dacryosialoadenopathia atrophicans”, but the latter has not come into general usage. In France the condition is known as the Gougerot‐Sjögren syndrome. The term “Sjögren's disease” has been used as the condition appears to be a fairly clearly defined one, but until more is known about its aetiology and especially its relationship to the syndromes of Mikulicz and Heerfordt, it might be as well to avoid the term and to use the less specific http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Clinical Practice Wiley

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References (7)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1742-1241
DOI
10.1111/j.1742-1241.1953.tb05604.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

a filamentous type of keratitis has been recognized since the late nineteenth century, but it was not appreciated until relatively recently that the threads were derived from the cornea and that the condition was due to a deficiency of tears. In 1927 the association of the condition with a chronic arthritis was first described. It was, however, due to the work, since 1930, of Henrik Sjögren of Jönköping in Sweden that the condition has become more widely known and the various facets of the full syndrome recognized (Sjögren, 1933). By 1940 he had reported 50 cases and had pointed out that the conjunctiva was also involved. He therefore proposed the more comprehensive name of “keratoconjunctivitis sicca” and also an alternative designation with a pathological basis namely “dacryosialoadenopathia atrophicans”, but the latter has not come into general usage. In France the condition is known as the Gougerot‐Sjögren syndrome. The term “Sjögren's disease” has been used as the condition appears to be a fairly clearly defined one, but until more is known about its aetiology and especially its relationship to the syndromes of Mikulicz and Heerfordt, it might be as well to avoid the term and to use the less specific

Journal

International Journal of Clinical PracticeWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1953

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