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SOCIAL RESEARCH, ISSUES, METHODS AND PROCESS

SOCIAL RESEARCH, ISSUES, METHODS AND PROCESS 152 Book reviews with a similar degrading of the acrual provision of care). A possible solution might be to offer a different kind of psychological service, and two chapters provide some thought-provoking material. Watson and Williams describe a model of feminist practice that takes note of the similarities between the therapist-patient relationship and traditional male-female relationships. Holland describes a community service in which the users have real input and control over psychological formulations and treatment, with powerful results. Other chapters were less successful. Stephen Frosh and Janet Sayers offer psycho­ analytic formulations, which this reviewer found unconvincing, both theoretically and in terms of improving services. Alternative psychodynamic frameworks, such as those based on attachment theory, would have been welcome. The influence of gen­ der in forensic psychology is really too big an issue to be dealt with in one chapter, and the result was muddled. This book is both stimulating and disappointing. This perhaps reflects the ongoing feminist discourse in mental health services, which is a process with both triumphs and setbacks. The most important need is the debate itself, and to that end this book is welcome. It should be of particular use to trainers and trainees in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health Wiley

SOCIAL RESEARCH, ISSUES, METHODS AND PROCESS

Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health , Volume 4 (2) – Jun 1, 1994

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
ISSN
0957-9664
eISSN
1471-2857
DOI
10.1002/cbm.1994.4.2.152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

152 Book reviews with a similar degrading of the acrual provision of care). A possible solution might be to offer a different kind of psychological service, and two chapters provide some thought-provoking material. Watson and Williams describe a model of feminist practice that takes note of the similarities between the therapist-patient relationship and traditional male-female relationships. Holland describes a community service in which the users have real input and control over psychological formulations and treatment, with powerful results. Other chapters were less successful. Stephen Frosh and Janet Sayers offer psycho­ analytic formulations, which this reviewer found unconvincing, both theoretically and in terms of improving services. Alternative psychodynamic frameworks, such as those based on attachment theory, would have been welcome. The influence of gen­ der in forensic psychology is really too big an issue to be dealt with in one chapter, and the result was muddled. This book is both stimulating and disappointing. This perhaps reflects the ongoing feminist discourse in mental health services, which is a process with both triumphs and setbacks. The most important need is the debate itself, and to that end this book is welcome. It should be of particular use to trainers and trainees in

Journal

Criminal Behaviour and Mental HealthWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.