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Spy in the sky: a method to identify pregnant small cetaceans

Spy in the sky: a method to identify pregnant small cetaceans Data on sex ratios, age classes, reproductive success and health status are key metrics to manage populations, yet can be difficult to collect in wild cetacean populations. Long‐term individual‐based studies provide a unique opportunity to apply unoccupied aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry to non‐invasively measure body morphometrics of individuals with known life history information. The aims of this study were (1) to compare length measurements from UAS photogrammetry with laser photogrammetry and (2) to explore whether UAS measurements of body width could be used to remotely determine pregnancy status, sex or age class in a well‐studied bottlenose dolphin population in Scotland. We carried out five boat‐based surveys in July and August 2017, with concurrent photo‐identification, UAS and laser photogrammetry. Photographs were measured using bespoke programmes, MorphMetriX for UAS photos and a Zooniverse project for laser photos. In total 64 dolphins were identified using photo‐ID, 54 of which had concurrent UAS body length and 47 with laser body length measurements. We also measured body widths at 10% increments from 10% to 90% of body length for 48 individuals of known sex, age class and/or pregnancy status. There was no significant difference in the length of individuals measured with UAS and laser photogrammetry. Discriminant analyses of the body width–length (WL) ratios expected to change during pregnancy, correctly assigned pregnancy status for 14 of the 15 females of known pregnancy status. Only one pregnant female was incorrectly assigned as not pregnant. However, our results showed that length and body width cannot accurately allocate these bottlenose dolphins to sex or age class using photogrammetry techniques alone. The present study illustrates that UAS and laser photogrammetry measurements are comparable for small cetaceans and demonstrates that UAS measurements of body WL ratio can accurately assign pregnancy status in bottlenose dolphins. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation Wiley

Spy in the sky: a method to identify pregnant small cetaceans

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References (85)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
2056-3485
eISSN
2056-3485
DOI
10.1002/rse2.258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Data on sex ratios, age classes, reproductive success and health status are key metrics to manage populations, yet can be difficult to collect in wild cetacean populations. Long‐term individual‐based studies provide a unique opportunity to apply unoccupied aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry to non‐invasively measure body morphometrics of individuals with known life history information. The aims of this study were (1) to compare length measurements from UAS photogrammetry with laser photogrammetry and (2) to explore whether UAS measurements of body width could be used to remotely determine pregnancy status, sex or age class in a well‐studied bottlenose dolphin population in Scotland. We carried out five boat‐based surveys in July and August 2017, with concurrent photo‐identification, UAS and laser photogrammetry. Photographs were measured using bespoke programmes, MorphMetriX for UAS photos and a Zooniverse project for laser photos. In total 64 dolphins were identified using photo‐ID, 54 of which had concurrent UAS body length and 47 with laser body length measurements. We also measured body widths at 10% increments from 10% to 90% of body length for 48 individuals of known sex, age class and/or pregnancy status. There was no significant difference in the length of individuals measured with UAS and laser photogrammetry. Discriminant analyses of the body width–length (WL) ratios expected to change during pregnancy, correctly assigned pregnancy status for 14 of the 15 females of known pregnancy status. Only one pregnant female was incorrectly assigned as not pregnant. However, our results showed that length and body width cannot accurately allocate these bottlenose dolphins to sex or age class using photogrammetry techniques alone. The present study illustrates that UAS and laser photogrammetry measurements are comparable for small cetaceans and demonstrates that UAS measurements of body WL ratio can accurately assign pregnancy status in bottlenose dolphins.

Journal

Remote Sensing in Ecology and ConservationWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2022

Keywords: bottlenose dolphin; cetacean; photogrammetry; pregnancy status; UAS; UAV

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