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Statuino: An Undercurrent of Anticlassicism in Italian Baroque Art Theory

Statuino: An Undercurrent of Anticlassicism in Italian Baroque Art Theory Detail from Antinous after Nicolas Poussin, 1672 ( plate ). As an adjective, the Italian term statuino – a seventeenth‐century neologism, now obsolete and confined to art‐theoretical terminology – resonates with ambiguity. Though the suffix –ino/a is not diminutive in this case, statuino intimates the notion – slightly pejorative – of diminished or unsatisfactory quality: an artwork looks statuino when it presents or preserves a little bit of the hardness or rigidness characteristic of a sculpture ( statua ) and occasionally of an antique. Without therefore conveying a blatant and irredeemable censure, statuino systematically evokes the idea of a glitch marring the perfection toward which artists should strive in inventing or executing a painting, a drawing, or even a print. Paradoxically, a statue might also be criticized as statuina . In his Vite , written in the third quarter of the seventeenth century, Giovan Battista Passeri notes that sculptors, ‘if they want to show off their outstanding knowledge of anatomy, will produce an odious dryness and hardness [ seccaggine e durezza ] that must be avoided’. In seventeenth‐century Italy and France, the contours or modelling of a sculpture are found defective when the work retains or does not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art History Wiley

Statuino: An Undercurrent of Anticlassicism in Italian Baroque Art Theory

Art History , Volume 38 (5) – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Association of Art Historians 2015
ISSN
0141-6790
eISSN
1467-8365
DOI
10.1111/1467-8365.12187
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Detail from Antinous after Nicolas Poussin, 1672 ( plate ). As an adjective, the Italian term statuino – a seventeenth‐century neologism, now obsolete and confined to art‐theoretical terminology – resonates with ambiguity. Though the suffix –ino/a is not diminutive in this case, statuino intimates the notion – slightly pejorative – of diminished or unsatisfactory quality: an artwork looks statuino when it presents or preserves a little bit of the hardness or rigidness characteristic of a sculpture ( statua ) and occasionally of an antique. Without therefore conveying a blatant and irredeemable censure, statuino systematically evokes the idea of a glitch marring the perfection toward which artists should strive in inventing or executing a painting, a drawing, or even a print. Paradoxically, a statue might also be criticized as statuina . In his Vite , written in the third quarter of the seventeenth century, Giovan Battista Passeri notes that sculptors, ‘if they want to show off their outstanding knowledge of anatomy, will produce an odious dryness and hardness [ seccaggine e durezza ] that must be avoided’. In seventeenth‐century Italy and France, the contours or modelling of a sculpture are found defective when the work retains or does not

Journal

Art HistoryWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2015

There are no references for this article.