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Taking Risks, Assessing Responsibility

Taking Risks, Assessing Responsibility Taking Risks, Assessing Responsibility by GERALD DWORKIN Tn discussions about the voluntary assumption of health I risks, there are four key terms-“voluntary ,” “responsibility,” “risk,” and “health.” I shall not be concerned at all here with definitions of health and I shall be concerned only incidentally with the concept of risk. My main task is to examine various ideas of responsibility, particularly as that concept has been discussed by philosophers, and to relate the philosophical material to the issue of formulating health policy. Two sets of questions are at issue-normative and conceptual. The latter are questions of causation, the types of things for which one can be responsible, and so forth. The former are questions about the principles of responsibility; disputes about what actions or consequences of actions people ought to be held responsible for and what the legitimate consequences of that responsibility ought to be. These two questions are harder to distinguish clearly in the area of responsibility than in any other area of moral philosophy. The very concept of responsibility itself is often used both to claim some connection (factual) between a person and some state of affairs and to claim that the person is in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hastings Center Report Wiley

Taking Risks, Assessing Responsibility

Hastings Center Report , Volume 11 (5) – Oct 1, 1981

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References (1)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1981 The Hastings Center
ISSN
0093-0334
eISSN
1552-146X
DOI
10.2307/3561296
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Taking Risks, Assessing Responsibility by GERALD DWORKIN Tn discussions about the voluntary assumption of health I risks, there are four key terms-“voluntary ,” “responsibility,” “risk,” and “health.” I shall not be concerned at all here with definitions of health and I shall be concerned only incidentally with the concept of risk. My main task is to examine various ideas of responsibility, particularly as that concept has been discussed by philosophers, and to relate the philosophical material to the issue of formulating health policy. Two sets of questions are at issue-normative and conceptual. The latter are questions of causation, the types of things for which one can be responsible, and so forth. The former are questions about the principles of responsibility; disputes about what actions or consequences of actions people ought to be held responsible for and what the legitimate consequences of that responsibility ought to be. These two questions are harder to distinguish clearly in the area of responsibility than in any other area of moral philosophy. The very concept of responsibility itself is often used both to claim some connection (factual) between a person and some state of affairs and to claim that the person is in

Journal

Hastings Center ReportWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1981

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