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Technology‐enhanced simulation in emergency medicine: Updated systematic review and meta‐analysis 1991–2021

Technology‐enhanced simulation in emergency medicine: Updated systematic review and meta‐analysis... BACKGROUNDTechnology‐enhanced simulation, defined as “an educational tool or device with which the learner physically interacts to mimic an aspect of clinical care for the purpose of teaching or assessment,”1 is used extensively in emergency medicine (EM) education.2 In their recent “Call to Action” Bentley and colleagues3 from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine's (SAEM) Simulation Academy highlighted the paucity of high‐quality EM simulation‐based research, citing a systematic review and meta‐analysis from almost a decade ago. The review by Ilgen and colleagues4 found that when compared to no other instruction simulation had large, favorable effects for knowledge‐, skills‐, and patient‐related outcomes; however, simulation had “generally small and nonsignificant benefits in comparison with other instruction.” At that time, Ilgen and colleagues4 recommended that to enhance the field we needed more high‐quality comparison studies with grounded research questions focused on specific instructional design features.Since 2013, there have been significant changes in simulation‐based medical education. Researchers and educators have studied various aspects of instructional design, such as which modalities to use (organic tissue, manufactured synthetic models, or a hybrid of the two), how they should be used (scenario‐based, task‐oriented, focused on teamwork), and where they should take place (simulation center, in situ at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AEM Education and Training Wiley

Technology‐enhanced simulation in emergency medicine: Updated systematic review and meta‐analysis 1991–2021

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References (91)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2023 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
eISSN
2472-5390
DOI
10.1002/aet2.10848
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDTechnology‐enhanced simulation, defined as “an educational tool or device with which the learner physically interacts to mimic an aspect of clinical care for the purpose of teaching or assessment,”1 is used extensively in emergency medicine (EM) education.2 In their recent “Call to Action” Bentley and colleagues3 from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine's (SAEM) Simulation Academy highlighted the paucity of high‐quality EM simulation‐based research, citing a systematic review and meta‐analysis from almost a decade ago. The review by Ilgen and colleagues4 found that when compared to no other instruction simulation had large, favorable effects for knowledge‐, skills‐, and patient‐related outcomes; however, simulation had “generally small and nonsignificant benefits in comparison with other instruction.” At that time, Ilgen and colleagues4 recommended that to enhance the field we needed more high‐quality comparison studies with grounded research questions focused on specific instructional design features.Since 2013, there have been significant changes in simulation‐based medical education. Researchers and educators have studied various aspects of instructional design, such as which modalities to use (organic tissue, manufactured synthetic models, or a hybrid of the two), how they should be used (scenario‐based, task‐oriented, focused on teamwork), and where they should take place (simulation center, in situ at

Journal

AEM Education and TrainingWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2023

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