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The distribution of some fungal and bacterial endophytes in maize (Zea mays L.)

The distribution of some fungal and bacterial endophytes in maize (Zea mays L.) Endophytic bacteria and fungi were isolated from healthy maize plants collected in a field in Devon. The average bacterial counts in the stem core tissues showed that the plant parts closer to the soil were more heavily colonized by bacteria than those near the top of the plants, and that the lower and middle part of the stems hosted the most frequently isolated bacterial species. Of the fungal species isolated, 12 had a relative importance of more than 10% in the core, 15 in the epidermis, and only 5 in the leaves. In general the distribution patterns were different among the three tissue types studied, with core and epidermis of the stems showing almost equal colonization frequencies and the leaves being most heavily colonized. More fungal species were recovered from the core and epidermis of the stem than from the leaves. The fungi most frequently isolated showed some patterns of tissue specificity, with Alternaria alternata almost exclusively associated with the leaves and Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanigerum most often present in the epidermal tissues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Phytologist Wiley

The distribution of some fungal and bacterial endophytes in maize (Zea mays L.)

New Phytologist , Volume 122 (2) – Oct 1, 1992

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References (43)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0028-646X
eISSN
1469-8137
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-8137.1992.tb04234.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Endophytic bacteria and fungi were isolated from healthy maize plants collected in a field in Devon. The average bacterial counts in the stem core tissues showed that the plant parts closer to the soil were more heavily colonized by bacteria than those near the top of the plants, and that the lower and middle part of the stems hosted the most frequently isolated bacterial species. Of the fungal species isolated, 12 had a relative importance of more than 10% in the core, 15 in the epidermis, and only 5 in the leaves. In general the distribution patterns were different among the three tissue types studied, with core and epidermis of the stems showing almost equal colonization frequencies and the leaves being most heavily colonized. More fungal species were recovered from the core and epidermis of the stem than from the leaves. The fungi most frequently isolated showed some patterns of tissue specificity, with Alternaria alternata almost exclusively associated with the leaves and Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanigerum most often present in the epidermal tissues.

Journal

New PhytologistWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1992

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

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