Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE FIRST PLANT COLLECTORS IN KASHMIR AND THE PUNJAB

THE FIRST PLANT COLLECTORS IN KASHMIR AND THE PUNJAB TAXON 28(1, 2/3): 5-11. APRIL 1979 Ralph R. Stewart! Introduction I must be Rogers McVaugh's oldest pupil. I did not know him until I was 70 and about to retire from Gordon College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, where I had worked from 1911 until 1960, except for occasional furloughs in this country. When Rogers took charge of the angiosperm herbarium in 1960, following the death of' Uncle' Harley Bartlett, his distinguished predecessor, he found that he had a legacy of some 150,000 specimens in bales and bundles in various store rooms. Some of these speci­ mens had been in storage for fifty years. As about 30,000 of these specimens were from India, McVaugh looked around to find someone with a knowledge of Indian plants. A friend told him that I was retiring from Gordon College and he wrote to inquire if I were available. As I "did not want to move into an Old Folks Home we gladly moved to Ann Arbor. Rogers may not have realized that I was his pupil but living and working in his herbarium, and watching the way he did things was an inspiration to me. I had been a lecturer and administrator in a missionary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Taxon Wiley

THE FIRST PLANT COLLECTORS IN KASHMIR AND THE PUNJAB

Taxon , Volume 28 (1-3) – Apr 1, 1979

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-first-plant-collectors-in-kashmir-and-the-punjab-8G7FdobTML

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) all rights reserved
ISSN
0040-0262
eISSN
1996-8175
DOI
10.2307/1219544
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TAXON 28(1, 2/3): 5-11. APRIL 1979 Ralph R. Stewart! Introduction I must be Rogers McVaugh's oldest pupil. I did not know him until I was 70 and about to retire from Gordon College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, where I had worked from 1911 until 1960, except for occasional furloughs in this country. When Rogers took charge of the angiosperm herbarium in 1960, following the death of' Uncle' Harley Bartlett, his distinguished predecessor, he found that he had a legacy of some 150,000 specimens in bales and bundles in various store rooms. Some of these speci­ mens had been in storage for fifty years. As about 30,000 of these specimens were from India, McVaugh looked around to find someone with a knowledge of Indian plants. A friend told him that I was retiring from Gordon College and he wrote to inquire if I were available. As I "did not want to move into an Old Folks Home we gladly moved to Ann Arbor. Rogers may not have realized that I was his pupil but living and working in his herbarium, and watching the way he did things was an inspiration to me. I had been a lecturer and administrator in a missionary

Journal

TaxonWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1979

There are no references for this article.