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The impact of fellowship‐trained medical toxicology faculty on emergency medicine resident in‐training examination scores

The impact of fellowship‐trained medical toxicology faculty on emergency medicine resident... INTRODUCTIONThe emergency medicine (EM) physician is expected to be an expert in the management of all acute and life‐threatening medical conditions. In order to be competent in this field, a broad knowledge base is required. EM residencies are designed to train a clinically competent physician, as well as prepare the trainee to demonstrate objective mastery of their field by becoming specialty board certified in EM. As part of this preparation, emergency medicine residents complete an annual In‐Training Examination (ITE), which is developed and administered by the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) and covers the breadth of emergency medicine.1 After successful completion of EM residency, graduates are eligible to pursue EM specialty board certification, which is designed to “objectively and independently confirm that physicians who complete an Emergency Medicine residency demonstrate core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to practice Emergency Medicine at the highest standards.”2 Both the ITE and Board Qualifying Examination are constructed from the comprehensive list of EM core content contained in the Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine (EM Model), which defines the scope of medical knowledge required for emergency physicians.3 Within the emergency medicine specialty, there are also multiple subspecialties that require additional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AEM Education and Training Wiley

The impact of fellowship‐trained medical toxicology faculty on emergency medicine resident in‐training examination scores

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2023 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
eISSN
2472-5390
DOI
10.1002/aet2.10840
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe emergency medicine (EM) physician is expected to be an expert in the management of all acute and life‐threatening medical conditions. In order to be competent in this field, a broad knowledge base is required. EM residencies are designed to train a clinically competent physician, as well as prepare the trainee to demonstrate objective mastery of their field by becoming specialty board certified in EM. As part of this preparation, emergency medicine residents complete an annual In‐Training Examination (ITE), which is developed and administered by the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) and covers the breadth of emergency medicine.1 After successful completion of EM residency, graduates are eligible to pursue EM specialty board certification, which is designed to “objectively and independently confirm that physicians who complete an Emergency Medicine residency demonstrate core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to practice Emergency Medicine at the highest standards.”2 Both the ITE and Board Qualifying Examination are constructed from the comprehensive list of EM core content contained in the Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine (EM Model), which defines the scope of medical knowledge required for emergency physicians.3 Within the emergency medicine specialty, there are also multiple subspecialties that require additional

Journal

AEM Education and TrainingWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2023

References