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The impact of receiving polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder on psychological distress, risk perception, and intentions to reduce drinking

The impact of receiving polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder on psychological distress,... For the return of polygenic risk scores to become an acceptable clinical practice in psychiatry, receipt of polygenic risk scores must be associated with minimal harm and changes in behavior that decrease one's risk for developing a psychiatric outcome. Data from a randomized controlled trial was used to assess the impact of different levels of hypothetical polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder on psychological distress, risk perception, and intentions to change drinking behaviors. The analytic sample consisted of 325 participants recruited from an urban, public university. Results demonstrated that there were significant increases in psychological distress as the level of genetic risk for alcohol use disorder increased. In addition, the perceived chance of developing alcohol use disorder significantly increased as the level of genetic risk increased. Promisingly, a greater proportion of participants indicated that they would intend to engage in follow‐up behaviors, such as seeking additional information, talking to a healthcare provider about risk, and reducing drinking behaviors, as the level of genetic risk increased. Returning polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder in a clinical setting has the potential to promote risk‐reducing behavior change, especially with increasing levels of genetic risk. The study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT05143073). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Wiley

The impact of receiving polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder on psychological distress, risk perception, and intentions to reduce drinking

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References (39)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2023 Wiley Periodicals LLC.
ISSN
1552-4841
eISSN
1552-485X
DOI
10.1002/ajmg.b.32933
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For the return of polygenic risk scores to become an acceptable clinical practice in psychiatry, receipt of polygenic risk scores must be associated with minimal harm and changes in behavior that decrease one's risk for developing a psychiatric outcome. Data from a randomized controlled trial was used to assess the impact of different levels of hypothetical polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder on psychological distress, risk perception, and intentions to change drinking behaviors. The analytic sample consisted of 325 participants recruited from an urban, public university. Results demonstrated that there were significant increases in psychological distress as the level of genetic risk for alcohol use disorder increased. In addition, the perceived chance of developing alcohol use disorder significantly increased as the level of genetic risk increased. Promisingly, a greater proportion of participants indicated that they would intend to engage in follow‐up behaviors, such as seeking additional information, talking to a healthcare provider about risk, and reducing drinking behaviors, as the level of genetic risk increased. Returning polygenic risk scores for alcohol use disorder in a clinical setting has the potential to promote risk‐reducing behavior change, especially with increasing levels of genetic risk. The study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT05143073).

Journal

American Journal of Medical Genetics Part BWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2023

Keywords: alcohol use disorder; genetic risk; personalized medicine; polygenic risk scores; prevention

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