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The MAGE proteins: Emerging roles in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and neurogenetic disease

The MAGE proteins: Emerging roles in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and neurogenetic disease Since the identification of the first MAGE gene in 1991, the MAGE family has expanded dramatically, and over 25 MAGE genes have now been identified in humans. The focus of studies on the MAGE proteins has been their potential for cancer immunotherapy, as a result of the finding that peptides derived from MAGE gene products are bound by major histocompatibility complexes and presented on the cell surface of cancer cells. However, the normal physiological role of MAGE proteins has remained a mystery. Recent studies are now beginning to provide insights into MAGE gene function. Necdin acts as a cell cycle regulatory protein and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Prader‐Willi syndrome, a neurogenetic disorder. MAGE‐D1, identified as a binding partner for the p75 neurotrophin receptor, the apoptosis inhibitory protein XIAP, and Dlx/MSX homeodomain proteins, blocks cell cycle progression and enhances apoptosis. This review provides an overview of the human MAGE genes and proteins, summarizes recent findings on their cellular roles, and provides a baseline for future studies on this intriguing gene family. © 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroscience Research Wiley

The MAGE proteins: Emerging roles in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and neurogenetic disease

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References (70)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0360-4012
eISSN
1097-4547
DOI
10.1002/jnr.10160
pmid
11891783
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since the identification of the first MAGE gene in 1991, the MAGE family has expanded dramatically, and over 25 MAGE genes have now been identified in humans. The focus of studies on the MAGE proteins has been their potential for cancer immunotherapy, as a result of the finding that peptides derived from MAGE gene products are bound by major histocompatibility complexes and presented on the cell surface of cancer cells. However, the normal physiological role of MAGE proteins has remained a mystery. Recent studies are now beginning to provide insights into MAGE gene function. Necdin acts as a cell cycle regulatory protein and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Prader‐Willi syndrome, a neurogenetic disorder. MAGE‐D1, identified as a binding partner for the p75 neurotrophin receptor, the apoptosis inhibitory protein XIAP, and Dlx/MSX homeodomain proteins, blocks cell cycle progression and enhances apoptosis. This review provides an overview of the human MAGE genes and proteins, summarizes recent findings on their cellular roles, and provides a baseline for future studies on this intriguing gene family. © 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 15, 2002

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