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The saiga Saiga tatarica: a review as a model for the management of endangered species

The saiga Saiga tatarica: a review as a model for the management of endangered species REFERENCE ANON (1976): Guide to bird gardens, zoos and wildlife n parks i Great Britain and Ireland. Cage Aviary Birds 1976 (16). The saiga Saiga tatarica: a review as a model for the management of endangered species JAMES M. D O L A N General Curator, San Die20 Wl Animal Park, San Diego Zoological Society, POB 725E, Escondido, id California 92025, U S A Ungulates have a long history of captive propagation dating back to 9000-7000 BC, when the process of domestication began. None the less, two genera stand out in their persistent failure to adapt to captivity outside their natural areas of distribution: the pronghorn Antilocap and the saiga Saiga. The saiga is often referred to as an antelope, which it is not. Rather, with its cousin the chiru or orongo Pantholops hodgsoni of the Tibetan Plateau, it is classed in a special tribe, the Saigii, of the subfamily Caprinae or goat-like animals. Morphologically, the saiga and chiru represent a more genuine bridge between the antelopes and the goats than do the Rupicaprini, or goatantelopes. Little is known concerning their origin, but because of their morphological, ecological and geographic specialisations - which make them peculiar even within http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

The saiga Saiga tatarica: a review as a model for the management of endangered species

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 17 (1) – Jan 1, 1977

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References (2)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1977.tb00861.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REFERENCE ANON (1976): Guide to bird gardens, zoos and wildlife n parks i Great Britain and Ireland. Cage Aviary Birds 1976 (16). The saiga Saiga tatarica: a review as a model for the management of endangered species JAMES M. D O L A N General Curator, San Die20 Wl Animal Park, San Diego Zoological Society, POB 725E, Escondido, id California 92025, U S A Ungulates have a long history of captive propagation dating back to 9000-7000 BC, when the process of domestication began. None the less, two genera stand out in their persistent failure to adapt to captivity outside their natural areas of distribution: the pronghorn Antilocap and the saiga Saiga. The saiga is often referred to as an antelope, which it is not. Rather, with its cousin the chiru or orongo Pantholops hodgsoni of the Tibetan Plateau, it is classed in a special tribe, the Saigii, of the subfamily Caprinae or goat-like animals. Morphologically, the saiga and chiru represent a more genuine bridge between the antelopes and the goats than do the Rupicaprini, or goatantelopes. Little is known concerning their origin, but because of their morphological, ecological and geographic specialisations - which make them peculiar even within

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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