Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Structure of Corporate Groups: the Italian case

The Structure of Corporate Groups: the Italian case Alessandro Zattoni* * Address for correspondence: Istituto di Economia aziendale, Á Universita Commerciale L. Bocconi, Viale Isonzo 23, 20135 - Milano, Italy. Tel: 39 2 - 5836.2527; Fax: 39 2 5836.2530; email: alessandro.zattoni@uni-bocconi.it First draft 20 October 1997, Second draft 19 June 1998, Accepted 17 July 1998. arge firms all over the world conduct their business through a number (tens or hundreds) of subsidiaries and associated companies, the single company that conducts its business without equity ties with other firms is nowadays the legal form adopted only by small enterprises. The corporate group is typical not only of developing countries such as Nicaragua or India, or of countries of late industrialisation such as Germany and Japan, but it is also the usual legal structure adopted in Anglo-Saxon countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom (Strachan, 1976; Chandler, 1982; Goto, 1982; Encaoua, Jacquemin, 1982; Tricker, 1984; Wymeersch, 1994; etc.). There are many reasons why firms adopt this complex structure: to minimise tax burdens, to follow the internationalisation process, to isolate the risks involved in certain activities or businesses, to take advantage of some legal regulations, and so on (Bonbright, Means, 1932; Hadden, 1984; Tricker, 1994; Zattoni, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Corporate Governance Wiley

The Structure of Corporate Groups: the Italian case

Corporate Governance , Volume 7 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-structure-of-corporate-groups-the-italian-case-Igo8RG08HX

References (11)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999
ISSN
0964-8410
eISSN
1467-8683
DOI
10.1111/1467-8683.00127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alessandro Zattoni* * Address for correspondence: Istituto di Economia aziendale, Á Universita Commerciale L. Bocconi, Viale Isonzo 23, 20135 - Milano, Italy. Tel: 39 2 - 5836.2527; Fax: 39 2 5836.2530; email: alessandro.zattoni@uni-bocconi.it First draft 20 October 1997, Second draft 19 June 1998, Accepted 17 July 1998. arge firms all over the world conduct their business through a number (tens or hundreds) of subsidiaries and associated companies, the single company that conducts its business without equity ties with other firms is nowadays the legal form adopted only by small enterprises. The corporate group is typical not only of developing countries such as Nicaragua or India, or of countries of late industrialisation such as Germany and Japan, but it is also the usual legal structure adopted in Anglo-Saxon countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom (Strachan, 1976; Chandler, 1982; Goto, 1982; Encaoua, Jacquemin, 1982; Tricker, 1984; Wymeersch, 1994; etc.). There are many reasons why firms adopt this complex structure: to minimise tax burdens, to follow the internationalisation process, to isolate the risks involved in certain activities or businesses, to take advantage of some legal regulations, and so on (Bonbright, Means, 1932; Hadden, 1984; Tricker, 1994; Zattoni,

Journal

Corporate GovernanceWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.