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Tourism and ethnicity: situational perspectives

Tourism and ethnicity: situational perspectives Ethnicity permeates many aspects of tourism, but remains poorly understood in this context. Ethnicity is also a problematic concept because of its variability and the complexity of its interrelation with social structure. Anthropological perspectives show that ethnicity is flexible and negotiated, and this paper draws attention to latent ethnicity and the dynamic character of responses to tourism. The strategies used by peoples in tourist destinations to cope with stereotyping are also discussed. Tourism also contributes to the process of identity formation in new nations, and may encourage majority populations to re‐evaluate their perceptions of minorities. In order to stimulate tourism, new nations also compete with one another to lay claim to illustrious names or heroic forebears. Situational adaptations to tourism are illustrated from a variety of perspectives to explore the complex processes of boundary creation, maintenance and change. The emphasis in the paper is conceptual, but is related to contemporary issues in interethnic relations as they occur in tourism. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Tourism Research Wiley

Tourism and ethnicity: situational perspectives

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References (47)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1099-2340
eISSN
1522-1970
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1522-1970(199901/02)1:1<17::AID-JTR145>3.0.CO;2-L
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ethnicity permeates many aspects of tourism, but remains poorly understood in this context. Ethnicity is also a problematic concept because of its variability and the complexity of its interrelation with social structure. Anthropological perspectives show that ethnicity is flexible and negotiated, and this paper draws attention to latent ethnicity and the dynamic character of responses to tourism. The strategies used by peoples in tourist destinations to cope with stereotyping are also discussed. Tourism also contributes to the process of identity formation in new nations, and may encourage majority populations to re‐evaluate their perceptions of minorities. In order to stimulate tourism, new nations also compete with one another to lay claim to illustrious names or heroic forebears. Situational adaptations to tourism are illustrated from a variety of perspectives to explore the complex processes of boundary creation, maintenance and change. The emphasis in the paper is conceptual, but is related to contemporary issues in interethnic relations as they occur in tourism. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

International Journal of Tourism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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