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Transgenic and gene disruption techniques in the study of neurocarcinogenesis

Transgenic and gene disruption techniques in the study of neurocarcinogenesis Transgenic technologies have come of age, and the field of carcinogenesis has profited extensively from the availability of these methods. Both the inappropriate expression of dominant oncogenes in specific tissues and the ability to “knock out” tumor suppressor genes in mammalian organisms have enabled substantial advancements of our understanding of development and progression of the neoplastic phenotype. In the first part of this article, we review the most popular techniques for modification of the mammalian genome in vivo, i.e. microinjection of fertilized eggs, retrovirus‐mediated gene transfer, and targeted gene deletion through homologous recombination. Subsequently, we attempt a critical evaluation of the available models of neurocarcinogenesis, and discuss their impact and future potential for the study of cancer in the nervous system. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glia Wiley

Transgenic and gene disruption techniques in the study of neurocarcinogenesis

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References (175)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0894-1491
eISSN
1098-1136
DOI
10.1002/glia.440150314
pmid
8586469
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Transgenic technologies have come of age, and the field of carcinogenesis has profited extensively from the availability of these methods. Both the inappropriate expression of dominant oncogenes in specific tissues and the ability to “knock out” tumor suppressor genes in mammalian organisms have enabled substantial advancements of our understanding of development and progression of the neoplastic phenotype. In the first part of this article, we review the most popular techniques for modification of the mammalian genome in vivo, i.e. microinjection of fertilized eggs, retrovirus‐mediated gene transfer, and targeted gene deletion through homologous recombination. Subsequently, we attempt a critical evaluation of the available models of neurocarcinogenesis, and discuss their impact and future potential for the study of cancer in the nervous system. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

GliaWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1995

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