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Trends and perspectives in animal‐attached remote sensing

Trends and perspectives in animal‐attached remote sensing Animal‐attached remote sensing, or bio‐logging, refers to the deployment of autonomous recording tags on free‐living animals, so that multiple variables can be monitored at rates of many times per second, thereby generating millions of data points over periods ranging from hours to years. Rapid advances in technology are allowing scientists to use data‐recording units to acquire huge, quantitative datasets of behavior from animals moving freely in their natural environment. In other words, scientists can examine wild animals in the field, behaving normally, with the same rigor that is normally used in the laboratory. The flexibility of such recording systems means that bio‐logging science operates at the interface of several biological disciplines, looking at a wide array of aquatic, airborne, and terrestrial species, monitoring not only the physical characteristics of the environment, but also the animal's reactions to it. This approach is critically important in an era when global change threatens the survival of species and where habitat loss is leading to widespread extinctions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Wiley

Trends and perspectives in animal‐attached remote sensing

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References (71)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Ecological Society of America
ISSN
1540-9295
eISSN
1540-9309
DOI
10.1890/1540-9295(2005)003[0437:TAPIAR]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Animal‐attached remote sensing, or bio‐logging, refers to the deployment of autonomous recording tags on free‐living animals, so that multiple variables can be monitored at rates of many times per second, thereby generating millions of data points over periods ranging from hours to years. Rapid advances in technology are allowing scientists to use data‐recording units to acquire huge, quantitative datasets of behavior from animals moving freely in their natural environment. In other words, scientists can examine wild animals in the field, behaving normally, with the same rigor that is normally used in the laboratory. The flexibility of such recording systems means that bio‐logging science operates at the interface of several biological disciplines, looking at a wide array of aquatic, airborne, and terrestrial species, monitoring not only the physical characteristics of the environment, but also the animal's reactions to it. This approach is critically important in an era when global change threatens the survival of species and where habitat loss is leading to widespread extinctions.

Journal

Frontiers in Ecology and the EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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