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Urethral strictures and their surgical treatment

Urethral strictures and their surgical treatment Introduction In most instances a urethral stricture is a narrowing of the calibre of the urethra caused by the presence of a scar consequent on infection or injury. However, not all strictures are caused by scarring, if a scar is taken to mean only fibrosis. So‐called congenital strictures of the bulbar urethra have a substantial smooth muscle content [ 1 ] and are thought to arise from failure of normal canalization rather than fibrotic restriction of a normal‐calibre urethra [ 2 ]. There is also a difference between a partial constriction of the urethra caused by, e.g. inflammation (in which the epithelial lining is retained) and a fibrotic obliteration between the distracted ends of a ruptured urethra. Thus not all strictures are the same. Aetiology However simple the pathology might appear to be, the aetiology of many strictures is unknown. When most strictures were gonococcal in origin it was nonetheless clear that a stricture did not necessarily follow an attack of gonorrhoea, and when it did the time lag could be considerable. Thus an episode of infection or trauma is not necessarily a direct cause of a stricture. In an interesting review of the anatomy of urethral stricture http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BJU International Wiley

Urethral strictures and their surgical treatment

BJU International , Volume 86 (5) – Sep 1, 2000

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References (55)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1464-4096
eISSN
1464-410X
DOI
10.1046/j.1464-410x.2000.00878.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction In most instances a urethral stricture is a narrowing of the calibre of the urethra caused by the presence of a scar consequent on infection or injury. However, not all strictures are caused by scarring, if a scar is taken to mean only fibrosis. So‐called congenital strictures of the bulbar urethra have a substantial smooth muscle content [ 1 ] and are thought to arise from failure of normal canalization rather than fibrotic restriction of a normal‐calibre urethra [ 2 ]. There is also a difference between a partial constriction of the urethra caused by, e.g. inflammation (in which the epithelial lining is retained) and a fibrotic obliteration between the distracted ends of a ruptured urethra. Thus not all strictures are the same. Aetiology However simple the pathology might appear to be, the aetiology of many strictures is unknown. When most strictures were gonococcal in origin it was nonetheless clear that a stricture did not necessarily follow an attack of gonorrhoea, and when it did the time lag could be considerable. Thus an episode of infection or trauma is not necessarily a direct cause of a stricture. In an interesting review of the anatomy of urethral stricture

Journal

BJU InternationalWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2000

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