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What is known and unknown about chemotherapy‐related cognitive impairment in patients with haematological malignancies and areas of needed research

What is known and unknown about chemotherapy‐related cognitive impairment in patients with... Cancer‐related cognitive impairment (CRCI) is an important clinical problem for cancer patients and survivors. In this review, we summarize studies investigating the occurrence of impaired cognition in patients with haematological malignancies. Most published studies focus on survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and primary central nervous system lymphoma. We also discuss studies conducted in acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myeloid leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), non‐HL and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Although research in this area is still emerging, it appears that a subset of chemotherapy‐treated haematological malignancy survivors experience CRCI. Future research should focus on expanding the literature reviewed here with larger studies appropriately powered to assess cognition via objective and subjective measures in a longitudinal fashion to tease apart the impact of disease and the various forms of cancer treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Haematology Wiley

What is known and unknown about chemotherapy‐related cognitive impairment in patients with haematological malignancies and areas of needed research

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References (88)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0007-1048
eISSN
1365-2141
DOI
10.1111/bjh.14211
pmid
27391367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cancer‐related cognitive impairment (CRCI) is an important clinical problem for cancer patients and survivors. In this review, we summarize studies investigating the occurrence of impaired cognition in patients with haematological malignancies. Most published studies focus on survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and primary central nervous system lymphoma. We also discuss studies conducted in acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myeloid leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), non‐HL and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Although research in this area is still emerging, it appears that a subset of chemotherapy‐treated haematological malignancy survivors experience CRCI. Future research should focus on expanding the literature reviewed here with larger studies appropriately powered to assess cognition via objective and subjective measures in a longitudinal fashion to tease apart the impact of disease and the various forms of cancer treatment.

Journal

British Journal of HaematologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2016

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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