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WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE BRAIN DRAIN (?)

WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE BRAIN DRAIN (?) ABSTRACT One of the characteristics of the relationship between the developed and developing worlds is the ‘brain drain’– the phenomenon by which expertise moves towards richer countries, thereby condemning poorer countries to continued comparative and absolute poverty. It is tempting to see the phenomenon as a moral problem in its own right, such that there is a moral imperative to end it, that is separate from (and additional to) any moral imperative to relieve the burden of poverty. However, it is not clear why this should be so – why, that is, there is a moral reason to stem the flow of expertise in addition to seeking to improve welfare. In this paper, I examine three explanations of the putative moral aspect of the brain drain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developing World Bioethics Wiley

WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE BRAIN DRAIN (?)

Developing World Bioethics , Volume 12 (3) – Dec 1, 2012

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
1471-8731
eISSN
1471-8847
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-8847.2011.00300.x
pmid
21790962
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT One of the characteristics of the relationship between the developed and developing worlds is the ‘brain drain’– the phenomenon by which expertise moves towards richer countries, thereby condemning poorer countries to continued comparative and absolute poverty. It is tempting to see the phenomenon as a moral problem in its own right, such that there is a moral imperative to end it, that is separate from (and additional to) any moral imperative to relieve the burden of poverty. However, it is not clear why this should be so – why, that is, there is a moral reason to stem the flow of expertise in addition to seeking to improve welfare. In this paper, I examine three explanations of the putative moral aspect of the brain drain.

Journal

Developing World BioethicsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.