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Who Secures Job Opportunities in the Chinese Government? Evidence Based on the First Jobs of Graduates from a Chinese College

Who Secures Job Opportunities in the Chinese Government? Evidence Based on the First Jobs of... Using a unique data set obtained from a Chinese college, the present paper investigates the determinants of obtaining a job in the Chinese Government. Despite the significant amount of attention paid to this issue by the media, academic study on this subject has been limited. We find that the parents' social capital, membership to the Communist Party, gender and personal ability significantly affect the possibility of a graduate obtaining a job in the public sector. Moreover, although acquiring a job in the government is difficult, no significant wage premium exists for graduates working in this sector. Finally, these results still hold after conducting the Heckman tests to validate the self‐selection bias. This study identifies the determinants of young Chinese people's aspirations to be civil servants, which raises significant policy implications for the government. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pacific Economic Review Wiley

Who Secures Job Opportunities in the Chinese Government? Evidence Based on the First Jobs of Graduates from a Chinese College

Pacific Economic Review , Volume 24 (3) – Aug 1, 2019

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References (38)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1361-374X
eISSN
1468-0106
DOI
10.1111/1468-0106.12216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a unique data set obtained from a Chinese college, the present paper investigates the determinants of obtaining a job in the Chinese Government. Despite the significant amount of attention paid to this issue by the media, academic study on this subject has been limited. We find that the parents' social capital, membership to the Communist Party, gender and personal ability significantly affect the possibility of a graduate obtaining a job in the public sector. Moreover, although acquiring a job in the government is difficult, no significant wage premium exists for graduates working in this sector. Finally, these results still hold after conducting the Heckman tests to validate the self‐selection bias. This study identifies the determinants of young Chinese people's aspirations to be civil servants, which raises significant policy implications for the government.

Journal

Pacific Economic ReviewWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2019

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