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Young adult’s perception towards the formation of stigma on people experiencing mental health conditions: A descriptive qualitative study

Young adult’s perception towards the formation of stigma on people experiencing mental health... Perpetuated by negative perceptions of mental illnesses, mental health has remained a taboo subject in Asia. This in turn leads to perceived discrimination among people experiencing mental health conditions, due to which they become withdrawn and secretive, making it more challenging for them to seek help. Studies have explored possible reasons affecting societal perception of those with such conditions. The results, however, have been inconclusive on how young adults would perceive them. Through a qualitative descriptive approach and one‐to‐one interviews, this study explored societal perception towards people experiencing mental health conditions in Singapore by involving 22 adults aged 21 to 29 residing locally. The interviews were conducted with a semi‐structured question guide developed through a literature review. Data were analysed through Braun and Clark’s six‐step thematic analysis. The results reveal three distinctive themes that have influenced such societal perception: (i) how views are formed; (ii) the illness does not represent the person; and (iii) complex experiences of family and loved ones. The holistic analysis herein enriches the current understanding of societal perceptions on how stigma is formed towards people experiencing mental health conditions. This would equip mental health professionals with the necessary information in devising measures to reduce stigmatization. Furthermore, families, employers, and students who constitute the future generation should be more engaged in this process, since a more tolerant and less discriminatory society will mean fewer obstacles for those with such conditions when attempting to reintegrate into the society. The study followed the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative studies 32‐item checklist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Mental Health Nursing Wiley

Young adult’s perception towards the formation of stigma on people experiencing mental health conditions: A descriptive qualitative study

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References (55)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2021 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.
ISSN
1445-8330
eISSN
1447-0349
DOI
10.1111/inm.12766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Perpetuated by negative perceptions of mental illnesses, mental health has remained a taboo subject in Asia. This in turn leads to perceived discrimination among people experiencing mental health conditions, due to which they become withdrawn and secretive, making it more challenging for them to seek help. Studies have explored possible reasons affecting societal perception of those with such conditions. The results, however, have been inconclusive on how young adults would perceive them. Through a qualitative descriptive approach and one‐to‐one interviews, this study explored societal perception towards people experiencing mental health conditions in Singapore by involving 22 adults aged 21 to 29 residing locally. The interviews were conducted with a semi‐structured question guide developed through a literature review. Data were analysed through Braun and Clark’s six‐step thematic analysis. The results reveal three distinctive themes that have influenced such societal perception: (i) how views are formed; (ii) the illness does not represent the person; and (iii) complex experiences of family and loved ones. The holistic analysis herein enriches the current understanding of societal perceptions on how stigma is formed towards people experiencing mental health conditions. This would equip mental health professionals with the necessary information in devising measures to reduce stigmatization. Furthermore, families, employers, and students who constitute the future generation should be more engaged in this process, since a more tolerant and less discriminatory society will mean fewer obstacles for those with such conditions when attempting to reintegrate into the society. The study followed the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative studies 32‐item checklist.

Journal

International Journal of Mental Health NursingWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2021

Keywords: ; ; ;

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