Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy EDGE Task Force: A Systematic Review of Measures of Balance in Adult Cancer Survivors

Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy EDGE Task Force: A Systematic Review of Measures of Balance... Background and Purpose: Balance impairments are prevalent in adult cancer survivors, leading to increased fall risk and reduced quality of life. To identify survivors in need of balance and fall interventions and to track change with intervention, health care providers need measures with sound psychometric properties and high clinical utility. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify reliable, valid, and clinically useful measures of balance impairments in adult cancer survivors. Secondary purposes were to obtain minimal detectable change of identified balance measures and to determine use of measures to evaluate fall risk. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to assess psychometric properties and clinical utility of balance measures identified from the literature search. Two reviewers in a team independently extracted data from articles and evaluated cumulative evidence for each balance measure using the Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcome Measure Rating Form. Results: The search located 187 articles, with 54 articles retained for quality assessment of balance measures. The Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and gait speed were highly recommended (rated 4). Balance Evaluation Systems Test, Timed Up and Go, and Five Times Sit to Stand were recommended (rated 3). Limitations: Selection bias is possible. Samples and settings across reviewed studies were widely heterogeneous. Conclusions: We recommend 5 balance measures for use in adult cancer survivors. Future research with existing balance measures should establish norms, responsiveness, and predictive validity for fall risk, while expanding to focus on imbalance in midlife survivors. Patient-reported outcome measures are needed for cancer-related imbalance. 1Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist; and Associate Professor, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 2Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist; Norton & APTA-Certified Edema Specialist; Director of Cancer Rehabilitation Science Program, Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City, OK; and Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK 3Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist, Mark O Hatfield Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 4Physical Therapist, St Charles Health System, Bend, OR 5Board-Certified Geriatric Clinical Specialist; and Associate Professor, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 6Rehabilitation Manager, MidMichigan Health, Midland, MI 7Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine; Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association; and Professor Emerita, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI Correspondence: Min H. Huang, PT, PhD, University of Michigan-Flint, 2157 WSW, 303 E. Kearsley St, Flint, MI 48502 (mhhuang@umich.edu). The authors declare no conflicts of interest. Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.rehabonc.com). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy EDGE Task Force: A Systematic Review of Measures of Balance in Adult Cancer Survivors

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters-kluwer-health/academy-of-oncologic-physical-therapy-edge-task-force-a-systematic-VDhr14uwnK

References (75)

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
2168-3808
eISSN
2381-2427
DOI
10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000177
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Balance impairments are prevalent in adult cancer survivors, leading to increased fall risk and reduced quality of life. To identify survivors in need of balance and fall interventions and to track change with intervention, health care providers need measures with sound psychometric properties and high clinical utility. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify reliable, valid, and clinically useful measures of balance impairments in adult cancer survivors. Secondary purposes were to obtain minimal detectable change of identified balance measures and to determine use of measures to evaluate fall risk. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to assess psychometric properties and clinical utility of balance measures identified from the literature search. Two reviewers in a team independently extracted data from articles and evaluated cumulative evidence for each balance measure using the Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcome Measure Rating Form. Results: The search located 187 articles, with 54 articles retained for quality assessment of balance measures. The Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and gait speed were highly recommended (rated 4). Balance Evaluation Systems Test, Timed Up and Go, and Five Times Sit to Stand were recommended (rated 3). Limitations: Selection bias is possible. Samples and settings across reviewed studies were widely heterogeneous. Conclusions: We recommend 5 balance measures for use in adult cancer survivors. Future research with existing balance measures should establish norms, responsiveness, and predictive validity for fall risk, while expanding to focus on imbalance in midlife survivors. Patient-reported outcome measures are needed for cancer-related imbalance. 1Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist; and Associate Professor, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 2Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist; Norton & APTA-Certified Edema Specialist; Director of Cancer Rehabilitation Science Program, Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City, OK; and Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK 3Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist, Mark O Hatfield Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 4Physical Therapist, St Charles Health System, Bend, OR 5Board-Certified Geriatric Clinical Specialist; and Associate Professor, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 6Rehabilitation Manager, MidMichigan Health, Midland, MI 7Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine; Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association; and Professor Emerita, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI Correspondence: Min H. Huang, PT, PhD, University of Michigan-Flint, 2157 WSW, 303 E. Kearsley St, Flint, MI 48502 (mhhuang@umich.edu). The authors declare no conflicts of interest. Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.rehabonc.com).

Journal

Rehabilitation OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2019

There are no references for this article.