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An Era of Lung Cancer Iconoclasts

An Era of Lung Cancer Iconoclasts EDITORIAL David P. Carbone, MD, PhD n the old days, non–small-cell lung cancer was simple—there were no effective screen- Iing test, no functionally important subtypes, it was a disease of smokers, was rarely cur- able, and the medical therapy options were limited to nonexistent, and neither familial nor somatic genetics was relevant. When diagnosed with lung cancer one of the first ques- tions acquaintances and physicians ask is “Did you smoke?” expecting a positive answer. Many physicians, if they asked about family history in lung cancer patients at all, generally ignored the information even if lung cancer was found in first-degree relatives, because of the high prevalence of this disease. Now everything has changed. In the span of a generation, it is now recognized that most cases of lung cancer occur in nonsmokers and many in never-smokers. Computed XXX tomography screening can detect it early and save lives, and genetically informed therapy selection is now standard of care with dramatic clinical benefit usually observed when therapy can be matched to specific gene mutations. However, somatic genetics has not played a role in this revolution to date. Perhaps presciently, during discussions of lung cancer genetics in the clinic, informed family http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Thoracic Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

An Era of Lung Cancer Iconoclasts

Journal of Thoracic Oncology , Volume 9 (4) – Apr 1, 2014

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References (2)

Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
ISSN
1556-0864
DOI
10.1097/JTO.0000000000000121
pmid
24736062
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL David P. Carbone, MD, PhD n the old days, non–small-cell lung cancer was simple—there were no effective screen- Iing test, no functionally important subtypes, it was a disease of smokers, was rarely cur- able, and the medical therapy options were limited to nonexistent, and neither familial nor somatic genetics was relevant. When diagnosed with lung cancer one of the first ques- tions acquaintances and physicians ask is “Did you smoke?” expecting a positive answer. Many physicians, if they asked about family history in lung cancer patients at all, generally ignored the information even if lung cancer was found in first-degree relatives, because of the high prevalence of this disease. Now everything has changed. In the span of a generation, it is now recognized that most cases of lung cancer occur in nonsmokers and many in never-smokers. Computed XXX tomography screening can detect it early and save lives, and genetically informed therapy selection is now standard of care with dramatic clinical benefit usually observed when therapy can be matched to specific gene mutations. However, somatic genetics has not played a role in this revolution to date. Perhaps presciently, during discussions of lung cancer genetics in the clinic, informed family

Journal

Journal of Thoracic OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 1, 2014

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