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Childhood cancer survivorship an update on evolving paradigms for understanding pathogenesis and screening for therapy-related late effects

Childhood cancer survivorship an update on evolving paradigms for understanding pathogenesis and... REVIEW URRENT Childhood cancer survivorship: an update on PINION evolving paradigms for understanding pathogenesis and screening for therapy-related late effects a b Saro H. Armenian and Leslie L. Robison Purpose of review Five-year survival for many childhood cancers approaches 80%, and there is a growing number of long-term survivors in the United States. These survivors are at risk for developing adverse health-related complications. We highlight recently published studies that provide new insight into the association between specific therapeutic exposures and late-occurring complications such as second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, endocrinopathies, and neurocognitive impairment. Recent findings The incidence for many long-term complications continues to increase with longer follow-up. Investigators have begun to explore the impact of aging and the role of genetic susceptibility as modifiers of risk in diseases wherein there is a clear association between therapeutic exposure and adverse outcome. Increased awareness of the importance of screening has set the stage for assessment of the impact of early detection for reduction of long-term morbidity and mortality among childhood cancer survivors at highest risk for therapy-related complications. Summary The long-term health-related burden in childhood cancer survivors is substantial. Recent studies exploring the etiopathogenesis of treatment-related late effects have provided important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Pediatrics Wolters Kluwer Health

Childhood cancer survivorship an update on evolving paradigms for understanding pathogenesis and screening for therapy-related late effects

Current Opinion in Pediatrics , Volume 25 (1) – Feb 1, 2013

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Copyright
Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
ISSN
1040-8703
eISSN
1531-698X
DOI
10.1097/MOP.0b013e32835b0b6a
pmid
23295717
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW URRENT Childhood cancer survivorship: an update on PINION evolving paradigms for understanding pathogenesis and screening for therapy-related late effects a b Saro H. Armenian and Leslie L. Robison Purpose of review Five-year survival for many childhood cancers approaches 80%, and there is a growing number of long-term survivors in the United States. These survivors are at risk for developing adverse health-related complications. We highlight recently published studies that provide new insight into the association between specific therapeutic exposures and late-occurring complications such as second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, endocrinopathies, and neurocognitive impairment. Recent findings The incidence for many long-term complications continues to increase with longer follow-up. Investigators have begun to explore the impact of aging and the role of genetic susceptibility as modifiers of risk in diseases wherein there is a clear association between therapeutic exposure and adverse outcome. Increased awareness of the importance of screening has set the stage for assessment of the impact of early detection for reduction of long-term morbidity and mortality among childhood cancer survivors at highest risk for therapy-related complications. Summary The long-term health-related burden in childhood cancer survivors is substantial. Recent studies exploring the etiopathogenesis of treatment-related late effects have provided important

Journal

Current Opinion in PediatricsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2013

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