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Correlates of Return to Work for Breast Cancer Survivors

Correlates of Return to Work for Breast Cancer Survivors Purpose: To identify correlates of return to work for employed breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods: Patients included 416 employed women with newly diagnosed breast cancer identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System. Patients were interviewed by telephone 12 and 18 months after diagnosis. Correlates of return to work at 12 and 18 months were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Results: More than 80% of patients returned to work during the study period, and 87% reported that their employer was accommodating to their cancer illness and treatment. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, health status, cancer stage, treatment, and job type, heavy lifting on the job (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.99), perceived employer accommodation for cancer illness and treatment (odds ratio = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.03 to 4.8), and perceived employer discrimination because of a cancer diagnosis (odds ratio = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.71) were independently associated with return to work at 12 months after breast cancer diagnosis, and perceived employer accommodation (odds ratio = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.06 to 5.1) was independently associated with return to work at 18 months after breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: A high percentage of employed breast cancer patients returned to work after treatment, and workplace accommodations played an important role in their return. In addition, perceived employer discrimination because of cancer was negatively associated with return to work for breast cancer survivors. Employers seem to have a pivotal role in breast cancer patients' successful return to work. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Correlates of Return to Work for Breast Cancer Survivors

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References (48)

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
(C) 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology
ISSN
0732-183X
eISSN
1527-7755
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2004.00.4929
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose: To identify correlates of return to work for employed breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods: Patients included 416 employed women with newly diagnosed breast cancer identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System. Patients were interviewed by telephone 12 and 18 months after diagnosis. Correlates of return to work at 12 and 18 months were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Results: More than 80% of patients returned to work during the study period, and 87% reported that their employer was accommodating to their cancer illness and treatment. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, health status, cancer stage, treatment, and job type, heavy lifting on the job (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.99), perceived employer accommodation for cancer illness and treatment (odds ratio = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.03 to 4.8), and perceived employer discrimination because of a cancer diagnosis (odds ratio = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.71) were independently associated with return to work at 12 months after breast cancer diagnosis, and perceived employer accommodation (odds ratio = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.06 to 5.1) was independently associated with return to work at 18 months after breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: A high percentage of employed breast cancer patients returned to work after treatment, and workplace accommodations played an important role in their return. In addition, perceived employer discrimination because of cancer was negatively associated with return to work for breast cancer survivors. Employers seem to have a pivotal role in breast cancer patients' successful return to work.

Journal

Journal of Clinical OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 20, 2006

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