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Factors Associated With Facial Nerve Paresis Following Gamma Knife for Vestibular Schwannoma

Factors Associated With Facial Nerve Paresis Following Gamma Knife for Vestibular Schwannoma Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/otology-neurotology by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/05/2020 Original Study Factors Associated With Facial Nerve Paresis Following Gamma Knife for Vestibular Schwannoma David K. Lerner, yDaniel Lee, yJames G. Naples, zJason A. Brant, zDouglas Bigelow, §Michelle Alonso-Basanta, and zMichael J. Ruckenstein Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York; yDepartment of Otolaryngology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; zDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology– Head and Neck Surgery; and §Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Objective: Evaluate the incidence of and potential contribu- (24.8%). Twelve patients (9.0%) experienced trigeminal pares- tory factors to facial nerve paresis and other cranial thesia, 11 (8.3%) developed sudden sensorineural hearing loss neuropathies (CN) following stereotactic radiosurgery with (SSNHL) requiring steroids, and seven (5.3%) demonstrated Gamma Knife (GK) for primary treatment of vestibular facial paresis. The mean maximum cochlear dose was 15.49 Gy schwannoma (VS). in patients with facial paresis compared with 12.42 Gy in Study Design: Retrospective chart review. subjects without facial paresis ( p ¼ 0.032). Subjects with facial Setting: Tertiary referral center. paresis were more likely to have a lateral tumor without fundal Patients: Charts were reviewed for all adult patients http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Otology & Neurotology Wolters Kluwer Health

Factors Associated With Facial Nerve Paresis Following Gamma Knife for Vestibular Schwannoma

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References (25)

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
1531-7129
eISSN
1537-4505
DOI
10.1097/MAO.0000000000002401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/otology-neurotology by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVA5KvPVPZ0P5BEgU+IUTEfzO/GUWifn2IfwcEVVH9SSn on 06/05/2020 Original Study Factors Associated With Facial Nerve Paresis Following Gamma Knife for Vestibular Schwannoma David K. Lerner, yDaniel Lee, yJames G. Naples, zJason A. Brant, zDouglas Bigelow, §Michelle Alonso-Basanta, and zMichael J. Ruckenstein Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York; yDepartment of Otolaryngology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; zDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology– Head and Neck Surgery; and §Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Objective: Evaluate the incidence of and potential contribu- (24.8%). Twelve patients (9.0%) experienced trigeminal pares- tory factors to facial nerve paresis and other cranial thesia, 11 (8.3%) developed sudden sensorineural hearing loss neuropathies (CN) following stereotactic radiosurgery with (SSNHL) requiring steroids, and seven (5.3%) demonstrated Gamma Knife (GK) for primary treatment of vestibular facial paresis. The mean maximum cochlear dose was 15.49 Gy schwannoma (VS). in patients with facial paresis compared with 12.42 Gy in Study Design: Retrospective chart review. subjects without facial paresis ( p ¼ 0.032). Subjects with facial Setting: Tertiary referral center. paresis were more likely to have a lateral tumor without fundal Patients: Charts were reviewed for all adult patients

Journal

Otology & NeurotologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2020

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