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Maternal Morbidity and Risk of Death at Delivery Hospitalization

Maternal Morbidity and Risk of Death at Delivery Hospitalization Maternal Morbidity and Risk of Death at Delivery Hospitalization Katherine H. Campbell, MD, MPH, David Savitz, PhD, Erika F. Werner, MD, MS, Christian M. Pettker, MD, Dena Goffman, MD, Cynthia Chazotte, MD, and Heather S. Lipkind, MD, MS OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of underlying mater- eclampsia (n544,004), 1.8% had chronic hypertension nal morbidities on the odds of maternal death during (n519,647), 1.1% of patients were classified as obese delivery hospitalization. (n511,936), 0.7% had pregestational diabetes (n57,474), 0.4% had HIV (n54,665), and 0.01% had pulmonary hy- METHODS: We used data that linked birth certificates to pertension (n5166). Preeclampsia or eclampsia (adjusted hospital discharge diagnoses from singleton live births at odds ratio [OR], 8.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5– 22 weeks of gestation or later during 1995–2003 in New 12.1), chronic hypertension (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI York City. Maternal morbidities examined included pre- 4.7–12.5), underlying maternal obesity (adjusted OR, pregnancy weight more than 114 kilograms (250 pounds), 2.9; 95% CI 1.1–8.1), pregestational diabetes (adjusted chronic hypertension, pregestational or gestational dia- OR, 3.3; 95% CI 1.3–8.1), HIV (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI betes mellitus, chronic cardiovascular disease, pulmonary 3.4–17.8), and pulmonary hypertension (adjusted OR, 65.1; hypertension, chronic lung disease, human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obstetrics & Gynecology Wolters Kluwer Health

Maternal Morbidity and Risk of Death at Delivery Hospitalization

Obstetrics & Gynecology , Volume 122 (3) – Sep 1, 2013

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References (28)

Copyright
© 2013 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
ISSN
0029-7844
eISSN
1873-233X
DOI
10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182a06f4e
pmid
23921870
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maternal Morbidity and Risk of Death at Delivery Hospitalization Katherine H. Campbell, MD, MPH, David Savitz, PhD, Erika F. Werner, MD, MS, Christian M. Pettker, MD, Dena Goffman, MD, Cynthia Chazotte, MD, and Heather S. Lipkind, MD, MS OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of underlying mater- eclampsia (n544,004), 1.8% had chronic hypertension nal morbidities on the odds of maternal death during (n519,647), 1.1% of patients were classified as obese delivery hospitalization. (n511,936), 0.7% had pregestational diabetes (n57,474), 0.4% had HIV (n54,665), and 0.01% had pulmonary hy- METHODS: We used data that linked birth certificates to pertension (n5166). Preeclampsia or eclampsia (adjusted hospital discharge diagnoses from singleton live births at odds ratio [OR], 8.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5– 22 weeks of gestation or later during 1995–2003 in New 12.1), chronic hypertension (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI York City. Maternal morbidities examined included pre- 4.7–12.5), underlying maternal obesity (adjusted OR, pregnancy weight more than 114 kilograms (250 pounds), 2.9; 95% CI 1.1–8.1), pregestational diabetes (adjusted chronic hypertension, pregestational or gestational dia- OR, 3.3; 95% CI 1.3–8.1), HIV (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI betes mellitus, chronic cardiovascular disease, pulmonary 3.4–17.8), and pulmonary hypertension (adjusted OR, 65.1; hypertension, chronic lung disease, human

Journal

Obstetrics & GynecologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Sep 1, 2013

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