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Measures of Cognitive Function and Work in Occupationally Active Breast Cancer Survivors

Measures of Cognitive Function and Work in Occupationally Active Breast Cancer Survivors ORIGINAL ARTICLE Measures of Cognitive Function and Work in Occupationally Active Breast Cancer Survivors Lisseth Calvio, PhD, Mark Peugeot, MS, Gina L. Bruns, MA, Briana L. Todd, MA, and Michael Feuerstein, PhD, MPH Although identification of specific cancer types was not possible, Objective: This study investigated performance-based and patient-reported the findings suggest that friction between the workplace and cancer cognitive limitations on work output. Methods: Working breast cancer survivor was sufficient to justify filing a claim. survivors (BCS) (n  122) and a non-cancer comparison group (NCCG; A subgroup of BCS report symptoms such as fatigue post- n  113) completed measures of cognitive function, fatigue, distress, job 8,9 primary treatment. For example, 34% of BCS experience signif- stress, and work output. Results: Distress, fatigue, and job stress were icant fatigue 5 to 10 years post-diagnosis. Symptoms of fatigue, higher in the BCS group who were on average 3-years post-treatment. depressive or anxious mood, pain, and changes in cognitive func- Patient-reported cognitive limitations at work were related to work output in tion such as working memory, executive functioning, organization, BCS (memory   0.29; executive function   0.26) only. Changes in 10 –13 and multitasking have been observed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Measures of Cognitive Function and Work in Occupationally Active Breast Cancer Survivors

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ISSN
1076-2752
eISSN
1536-5948
DOI
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181d0bef7
pmid
20134340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Measures of Cognitive Function and Work in Occupationally Active Breast Cancer Survivors Lisseth Calvio, PhD, Mark Peugeot, MS, Gina L. Bruns, MA, Briana L. Todd, MA, and Michael Feuerstein, PhD, MPH Although identification of specific cancer types was not possible, Objective: This study investigated performance-based and patient-reported the findings suggest that friction between the workplace and cancer cognitive limitations on work output. Methods: Working breast cancer survivor was sufficient to justify filing a claim. survivors (BCS) (n  122) and a non-cancer comparison group (NCCG; A subgroup of BCS report symptoms such as fatigue post- n  113) completed measures of cognitive function, fatigue, distress, job 8,9 primary treatment. For example, 34% of BCS experience signif- stress, and work output. Results: Distress, fatigue, and job stress were icant fatigue 5 to 10 years post-diagnosis. Symptoms of fatigue, higher in the BCS group who were on average 3-years post-treatment. depressive or anxious mood, pain, and changes in cognitive func- Patient-reported cognitive limitations at work were related to work output in tion such as working memory, executive functioning, organization, BCS (memory   0.29; executive function   0.26) only. Changes in 10 –13 and multitasking have been observed.

Journal

Journal of Occupational and Environmental MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2010

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