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Methamphetamines and Pregnancy Outcomes

Methamphetamines and Pregnancy Outcomes ORIGINAL RESEARCH Tricia E. Wright, MD, MS, Renee Schuetter, RN, MEd, Jacqueline Tellei, BA, and Lynnae Sauvage, MD g vs 3300 g; P = 0.01). Gestation was significantly shorter among Introduction: Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most commonly the MA-exposed infants than that among nonexposed infants (38.5 used illicit drugs in pregnancy, yet studies on MA-exposed pregnancy vs 39.1 weeks; P = 0.045), and those with no drug exposure (38.5 outcomes have been limited because of retrospective measures of drug vs 39.5; P = 0.0011), the infants with positive toxicology at birth use; lack of control for confounding factors; other drug use, including had a clinically relevant shortening of gestation (37.3 weeks vs 39.1; tobacco; poverty; poor diet; and lack of prenatal care. This study P = 0.0002). presents prospective collected data on MA use and birth outcomes, Conclusions: Methamphetamine use during pregnancy is associated controlling for most confounders. with shorter gestational ages and lower birth weight, especially if Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of used continuously during pregnancy. Stopping MA use at any time women obtaining prenatal care from a clinic treating women with sub- during pregnancy improves birth outcomes, thus resources should http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Addiction Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Methamphetamines and Pregnancy Outcomes

Journal of Addiction Medicine , Volume 9 (2) – Mar 1, 2015

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References (43)

Copyright
© 2015 American Society of Addiction Medicine
ISSN
1932-0620
eISSN
1935-3227
DOI
10.1097/ADM.0000000000000101
pmid
25599434
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Tricia E. Wright, MD, MS, Renee Schuetter, RN, MEd, Jacqueline Tellei, BA, and Lynnae Sauvage, MD g vs 3300 g; P = 0.01). Gestation was significantly shorter among Introduction: Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most commonly the MA-exposed infants than that among nonexposed infants (38.5 used illicit drugs in pregnancy, yet studies on MA-exposed pregnancy vs 39.1 weeks; P = 0.045), and those with no drug exposure (38.5 outcomes have been limited because of retrospective measures of drug vs 39.5; P = 0.0011), the infants with positive toxicology at birth use; lack of control for confounding factors; other drug use, including had a clinically relevant shortening of gestation (37.3 weeks vs 39.1; tobacco; poverty; poor diet; and lack of prenatal care. This study P = 0.0002). presents prospective collected data on MA use and birth outcomes, Conclusions: Methamphetamine use during pregnancy is associated controlling for most confounders. with shorter gestational ages and lower birth weight, especially if Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of used continuously during pregnancy. Stopping MA use at any time women obtaining prenatal care from a clinic treating women with sub- during pregnancy improves birth outcomes, thus resources should

Journal

Journal of Addiction MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2015

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