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Prevalence and Causes of Fatigue After Cancer Treatment: The Next Generation of Research

Prevalence and Causes of Fatigue After Cancer Treatment: The Next Generation of Research VOLUME 23  NUMBER 33  NOVEMBER 20 2005 EDITORIAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Prevalence and Causes of Fatigue After Cancer Treatment: The Next Generation of Research Julienne E. Bower, Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; and Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA The presence of fatigue in cancer patients is now well tigue. Third, approximately 20% of women were classified documented. Fatigue is recognized as the most common as fatigued at each assessment point. This categorization was based on women’s scores on the SF-36 vitality scale; if and distressing side effect of cancer treatment, occurring they scored 46 on this scale (at least one standard deviation among patients undergoing radiation, chemotherapy, and below the mean score for Dutch women in the general popu- treatment with biologic response modifiers. Furthermore, lation), they were classified as fatigued. Fourth, fatigue was there is evidence that fatigue may persist for months or strongly correlated with mental health and with muscle and years after completion of successful treatment in a substan- joint pain, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Prevalence and Causes of Fatigue After Cancer Treatment: The Next Generation of Research

Journal of Clinical Oncology , Volume 23 (33) – Nov 20, 2005

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References (22)

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
(C) 2005 American Society of Clinical Oncology
ISSN
0732-183X
eISSN
1527-7755
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2005.08.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VOLUME 23  NUMBER 33  NOVEMBER 20 2005 EDITORIAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Prevalence and Causes of Fatigue After Cancer Treatment: The Next Generation of Research Julienne E. Bower, Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; and Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA The presence of fatigue in cancer patients is now well tigue. Third, approximately 20% of women were classified documented. Fatigue is recognized as the most common as fatigued at each assessment point. This categorization was based on women’s scores on the SF-36 vitality scale; if and distressing side effect of cancer treatment, occurring they scored 46 on this scale (at least one standard deviation among patients undergoing radiation, chemotherapy, and below the mean score for Dutch women in the general popu- treatment with biologic response modifiers. Furthermore, lation), they were classified as fatigued. Fourth, fatigue was there is evidence that fatigue may persist for months or strongly correlated with mental health and with muscle and years after completion of successful treatment in a substan- joint pain, but

Journal

Journal of Clinical OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Nov 20, 2005

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