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Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities

Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/greenjournal by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVJ2toCr/9wZZjwPUWvYES9l2nY+zyylnl33NGMK6MRsx on 10/02/2020 Original Research Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPP, Natalia N. Egorova, PhD, MPH, Teresa Janevic, PhD, MPH, Michael Brodman, MD, Amy Balbierz, MPH, Jennifer Zeitlin, DSc, MA, and Paul L. Hebert, PhD OBJECTIVE: To examine within-hospital racial and eth- hospital adjusted rates using paired t-tests and condi- nic disparities in severe maternal morbidity rates and tional logit models. determine whether they are associated with differences RESULTS: Severe maternal morbidity was higher among in types of medical insurance. black and Latina women than white women (4.2% and METHODS: We conducted a population-based, cross- 2.9% vs 1.5%, respectively, P,.001) and among women sectional study using linked 2010–2014 New York City insured by Medicaid than those commercially insured discharge and birth certificate data sets (N5591,455 (2.8% vs 2.0%, P,.001). Women insured by Medicaid deliveries) to examine within-hospital black–white, compared with those with commercial insurance had Latina–white, and Medicaid–commercially insured dif- similar risk for severe maternal morbidity within the ferences in severe maternal morbidity. We used logistic same hospital (P5.54). In contrast, black women com- regression to produce risk-adjusted rates of severe pared with white women http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obstetrics & Gynecology Wolters Kluwer Health

Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2020 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0029-7844
eISSN
1873-233X
DOI
10.1097/AOG.0000000000003667
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/greenjournal by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVJ2toCr/9wZZjwPUWvYES9l2nY+zyylnl33NGMK6MRsx on 10/02/2020 Original Research Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPP, Natalia N. Egorova, PhD, MPH, Teresa Janevic, PhD, MPH, Michael Brodman, MD, Amy Balbierz, MPH, Jennifer Zeitlin, DSc, MA, and Paul L. Hebert, PhD OBJECTIVE: To examine within-hospital racial and eth- hospital adjusted rates using paired t-tests and condi- nic disparities in severe maternal morbidity rates and tional logit models. determine whether they are associated with differences RESULTS: Severe maternal morbidity was higher among in types of medical insurance. black and Latina women than white women (4.2% and METHODS: We conducted a population-based, cross- 2.9% vs 1.5%, respectively, P,.001) and among women sectional study using linked 2010–2014 New York City insured by Medicaid than those commercially insured discharge and birth certificate data sets (N5591,455 (2.8% vs 2.0%, P,.001). Women insured by Medicaid deliveries) to examine within-hospital black–white, compared with those with commercial insurance had Latina–white, and Medicaid–commercially insured dif- similar risk for severe maternal morbidity within the ferences in severe maternal morbidity. We used logistic same hospital (P5.54). In contrast, black women com- regression to produce risk-adjusted rates of severe pared with white women

Journal

Obstetrics & GynecologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2020

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