Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety Reactivity in Daily Life: A Daily Process Approach to Gene-Environment Interaction

Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety Reactivity in Daily Life: A... Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety Reactivity in Daily Life: A Daily Process Approach to Gene-Environment Interaction KATHLEEN C. GUNTHERT,PHD, TAMLIN S. CONNER,PHD, STEPHEN ARMELI,PHD, HOWARD TENNEN,PHD, JONATHAN COVAULT, MD, PHD, AND HENRY R. KRANZLER,MD Objective: To test whether individuals with at least one copy of the short (S) or long (L) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) exhibit greater increases in anxiety, compared with L L individuals, under periods of high daily A A stress. Although this common polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene has been identified as a vulnerability factor for anxiety, findings in the literature are mixed. Discrepant findings could be explained by recent research showing that 5-HTTLPR is functionally triallelic (L versus L or S), rather than biallelic (L versus S). Mixed findings could also result from a lack of attention A G to diathesis-stress models, whereby genetic vulnerability is considered latent until activated by stress (gene-environment interplay). Based on this model, we argue that genotype differences in anxiety should be stronger in the presence of stress. Methods: A total of 350 college students recorded their daily stressors and mood for two 30-day periods, separated by 1 year. Results: Across both years, diathesis-stress http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychosomatic Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety Reactivity in Daily Life: A Daily Process Approach to Gene-Environment Interaction

Psychosomatic Medicine , Volume 69 (8) – Oct 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters-kluwer-health/serotonin-transporter-gene-polymorphism-5-httlpr-and-anxiety-HQ6TgbyWS4

References (43)

ISSN
0033-3174
eISSN
1534-7796
DOI
10.1097/PSY.0b013e318157ad42
pmid
17942837
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Anxiety Reactivity in Daily Life: A Daily Process Approach to Gene-Environment Interaction KATHLEEN C. GUNTHERT,PHD, TAMLIN S. CONNER,PHD, STEPHEN ARMELI,PHD, HOWARD TENNEN,PHD, JONATHAN COVAULT, MD, PHD, AND HENRY R. KRANZLER,MD Objective: To test whether individuals with at least one copy of the short (S) or long (L) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) exhibit greater increases in anxiety, compared with L L individuals, under periods of high daily A A stress. Although this common polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene has been identified as a vulnerability factor for anxiety, findings in the literature are mixed. Discrepant findings could be explained by recent research showing that 5-HTTLPR is functionally triallelic (L versus L or S), rather than biallelic (L versus S). Mixed findings could also result from a lack of attention A G to diathesis-stress models, whereby genetic vulnerability is considered latent until activated by stress (gene-environment interplay). Based on this model, we argue that genotype differences in anxiety should be stronger in the presence of stress. Methods: A total of 350 college students recorded their daily stressors and mood for two 30-day periods, separated by 1 year. Results: Across both years, diathesis-stress

Journal

Psychosomatic MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Oct 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.