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To Admit or Not to Admit: Emergency Department Discharges After Request for Medicine Admission

To Admit or Not to Admit: Emergency Department Discharges After Request for Medicine Admission Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/jhqonline by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVJ2toCr/9wZZjwPUWvYES9l2nY+zyylnl33NGMK6MRsx on 10/01/2020 Original Article To Admit or Not to Admit: Emergency Department Discharges After Request for Medicine Admission Nazima Allaudeen Julia S. Breckenridge Anita A. Vashi · · ABSTRACT Background: The decision to discharge versus admit a patient from the emergency department (ED) carries significant con- sequences to the patient and healthcare system. Methods: We evaluated all ED visits at a single facility from January 1–December 31, 2015, where the ED provider initially requested admission to medicine; however, following medicine evaluation, the patient was discharged from the ED. Results: 8.1% of medicine referrals resulted in discharge from the ED after referral for admission. 62.6% lacked documentation by medicine or another consulting service. Patients completed clinic follow-up within 7 or 30 days, 52.8% and 76.0% respectively. Emergency department revisit rates were similar for patients not referred versus referred for admission (8.0% vs. 8.1%, 13.3% vs. 14.6%, and 29.9% vs. 28.9% at 3, 7, and 30 days, respectively p-value. .05). Hospital admission during the follow-up period was also similar for these two groups (1.8% vs. 2.8%, 3.9% vs. 5.7%, and 11.3% vs. 15.0% at 3, 7, and 30 days, respectively p-value . .05). Conclusions: Patients discharged http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Healthcare Quality Wolters Kluwer Health

To Admit or Not to Admit: Emergency Department Discharges After Request for Medicine Admission

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References (11)

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2020 National Association for Healthcare Quality
ISSN
1062-2551
eISSN
1945-1474
DOI
10.1097/JHQ.0000000000000256
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://journals.lww.com/jhqonline by BhDMf5ePHKbH4TTImqenVJ2toCr/9wZZjwPUWvYES9l2nY+zyylnl33NGMK6MRsx on 10/01/2020 Original Article To Admit or Not to Admit: Emergency Department Discharges After Request for Medicine Admission Nazima Allaudeen Julia S. Breckenridge Anita A. Vashi · · ABSTRACT Background: The decision to discharge versus admit a patient from the emergency department (ED) carries significant con- sequences to the patient and healthcare system. Methods: We evaluated all ED visits at a single facility from January 1–December 31, 2015, where the ED provider initially requested admission to medicine; however, following medicine evaluation, the patient was discharged from the ED. Results: 8.1% of medicine referrals resulted in discharge from the ED after referral for admission. 62.6% lacked documentation by medicine or another consulting service. Patients completed clinic follow-up within 7 or 30 days, 52.8% and 76.0% respectively. Emergency department revisit rates were similar for patients not referred versus referred for admission (8.0% vs. 8.1%, 13.3% vs. 14.6%, and 29.9% vs. 28.9% at 3, 7, and 30 days, respectively p-value. .05). Hospital admission during the follow-up period was also similar for these two groups (1.8% vs. 2.8%, 3.9% vs. 5.7%, and 11.3% vs. 15.0% at 3, 7, and 30 days, respectively p-value . .05). Conclusions: Patients discharged

Journal

Journal for Healthcare QualityWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jun 1, 2020

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